Reviews

Kindred: A Graphic Novel Adaptation by Octavia E. Butler

maddognews's review

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dark emotional sad tense medium-paced
  • Plot- or character-driven? A mix
  • Strong character development? Yes
  • Loveable characters? N/A
  • Diverse cast of characters? Yes
  • Flaws of characters a main focus? No

3.0

I enjoyed the book so I would definitely check out the book it’s based on.

hmetwade's review

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dark emotional reflective sad tense medium-paced
  • Plot- or character-driven? Character
  • Strong character development? No
  • Loveable characters? It's complicated
  • Diverse cast of characters? Yes
  • Flaws of characters a main focus? It's complicated

4.0


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dizzybridge's review against another edition

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dark tense
  • Diverse cast of characters? Yes
  • Flaws of characters a main focus? Yes

5.0

shelfcarewithshan's review

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5.0

I had not read Kindred before picking up this graphic novel, but I definitely will now! I think this book is a great introduction into Kindred, that was moving, harrowing, and devastating but brilliantly done. I highly recommend folks to check this adaptation out.

Dana is a Black woman living in the 1970s when suddenly she is transported back to the early 1800s South. She is brought back due to Rufus, a white boy who is the son of a plantation and slave owner, who seems to get himself close to death often (which brings Dana back.) This book shows how Dana tries to navigate in this terrible and hostile world - where she witnesses and experiences the horrors of slavery along with other characters in the book.

A harrowing but important book, Octavia Butler’s work comes to life through this graphic novel format. 5.5 stars ⭐️

booksonawire's review

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4.0

Science Fiction is not my genre, I know that about myself so going into my first Octavia E. Butler was daunting. I fully expected to be affected by it - and I was - but I also didn't know how much science fiction would be there and if it would take me out of the story. Thankfully not much, it didn't try to explain how she time travelled, it was more about Dana's life and relationships with her ancestors.

The graphic novel was a great introduction to Butler and I now want to read the original novel and have Fledgling on my TBR. The artwork wasn't a favorite, but the story was incredible.

riahwamby's review against another edition

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dark emotional reflective fast-paced
  • Plot- or character-driven? A mix
  • Strong character development? It's complicated
  • Loveable characters? It's complicated
  • Diverse cast of characters? Yes
  • Flaws of characters a main focus? Yes

4.5

moon_dude's review against another edition

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adventurous dark emotional mysterious fast-paced

4.0

Gorgeous illustration. Nothing new: Octavia E. Butler is a genius.

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samidhak's review

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4.0

Wow!

saramarie08's review

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5.0

Read more graphic novel reviews at www.graphiclibrary.org.

Illustrated by John Jennings, adapted from the original novel, Kindred by Octavia E. Butler

Dana and her husband Kevin are unpacking into their new home in 1970s Los Angeles. Suddenly, she is inexplicably transported to pre-Civil War south and saves a young boy who is drowning in a river. She returns to her home shortly after and has no way of explaining to Kevin why she is soaking wet. A short while later, she is transported again to the boy's bedroom, where he is setting fire to his drapes. Through talking with the boy, she realizes that he is part of her ancestry, as the slave owner who fathered her great-grandmother. Dana is transported back and forth several times, with Kevin hurriedly coming with her on one occasion. They realize that Dana is taken back any time Rufus' life is in danger, and she is returned home when her life is in danger. Through many trips to Rufus' plantation and discussion with slaves and slave owners, Dana becomes a part of life, with all the horrors that slavery possess. She is beaten on several occasions, nurses other beaten slaves back to health, helps Rufus in obtaining the slave woman he desires, and tries to teach the children how to read.

From an NPR story on Butler's writing, "Butler often said she was inspired to write it when she heard young black people minimize the severity of slavery, and strongly assert what they would or would not have tolerated if they were enslaved. She wanted them to not only know the facts of slavery, but how slavery felt." This graphic novel picks up that torch and runs further with it. The illustrations by John Jennings truly make the reader feel the savagery of slavery. I read this book in one sitting because I was riveted and had to see how Dana would survive, but it is not for the feint of heart, and there are some really dark and brutal moments. I felt Dana's terror, her pain from the lashings, the broken bones, and I seethed anger at her captors and the treatment they bestowed on other human beings. This graphic novel is a wonderful and faithful adaptation that brings this important story into a new medium, stretching its influence and power to more audiences.

Sara's Rating: 10/10
Suitability Level: Grades 10-12

liz_biz's review against another edition

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dark emotional sad tense fast-paced
  • Plot- or character-driven? A mix
  • Strong character development? Yes
  • Loveable characters? It's complicated
  • Diverse cast of characters? Yes
  • Flaws of characters a main focus? Yes

4.0