Reviews

The Invisible Life of Addie LaRue, by V.E. Schwab

m_antoinette_c's review against another edition

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inspiring mysterious reflective medium-paced
  • Plot- or character-driven? A mix
  • Strong character development? Yes
  • Loveable characters? Yes
  • Diverse cast of characters? It's complicated
  • Flaws of characters a main focus? Yes

5.0

frxyas's review

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5.0

I cannot write a review that will convey what I felt for this novel. The pace, the dynamics, the ending. it might seem slow to begin with but this all works in the novels favour. I encourage everyone to read this book

shoshpursley's review against another edition

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emotional hopeful reflective medium-paced
  • Plot- or character-driven? A mix
  • Strong character development? Yes
  • Loveable characters? Yes
  • Diverse cast of characters? Yes
  • Flaws of characters a main focus? No

5.0

mossfloor's review

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not rating until my skype chat with jenn but

is this my favorite book i’ve ever read? yes
did i sob? yes
did i get very angry? yes

ok time to go dissociate

changinglaines's review

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emotional reflective medium-paced
  • Plot- or character-driven? A mix
  • Strong character development? Yes
  • Loveable characters? Yes
  • Diverse cast of characters? No
  • Flaws of characters a main focus? Yes

4.0

mehairix's review

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2.0

too much time world building / didn’t like the writing style :/

shelf_inspiration's review

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5.0

5 Stars

“...It is sad, of course, to forget. But it is a lonely thing, to be forgotten. To remember when no one else does.” -The Invisible Life of Addie LaRue.

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REVIEW: This book follows the life of Addie LaRue. When living in France in 1714, Addie makes a desperate bargain to live forever and is cursed to be forgotten by everyone she meets. Thus, her life begins across centuries, continents, and through history and art. On her journey, Addie will learn just how far she will go in order to leave her mark on the world. However, after nearly 300 years of life, Addie comes across a young man in a hidden bookstore, and he remembers her name.

Everything about this book is five stars: the plot, characters, setting, and writing. It was such a beautiful and heart-wrenching story about the joys and sorrows of life. What it truly means to be alive, to be remembered, and to make an impact in this world. While it is very literary, and could be seen as “slow” in terms of plot, I found it to be completely captivating and even thought-provoking. I know that I will be thinking about Addie’s story for a long time and that I will feel the echoes of its impact. If you haven’t had the chance to read this yet, go grab it!

SYNOPSIS: France, 1714: in a moment of desperation, a young woman makes a Faustian bargain to live forever and is cursed to be forgotten by everyone she meets.

Thus begins the extraordinary life of Addie LaRue, and a dazzling adventure that will play out across centuries and continents, across history and art, as a young woman learns how far she will go to leave her mark on the world.

But everything changes when, after nearly 300 years, Addie stumbles across a young man in a hidden bookstore and he remembers her name.

yazmii's review against another edition

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challenging dark emotional sad tense medium-paced
  • Plot- or character-driven? Character
  • Strong character development? N/A
  • Loveable characters? Yes
  • Diverse cast of characters? N/A
  • Flaws of characters a main focus? No

4.5

xkay_readsx's review against another edition

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3.0

" I didn't want to live forever. I just wanted to live."

Addie LaRue made a deal with a devil. She's immortal, but also became forgettable.

I don't know how the author can possibly make this a boring story. Redeemable last 15% so I can see why so many readers love this book.

emycustodio's review against another edition

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4.0

"Never pray to the gods that answer after dark."

The Invisible Life of Addie LaRue is a stunning novel, and it is the book that proves that V.E Schwab not only has the power to tell stories but to tell them beautifully. Her writing technique here -- more than ever -- is splendid. She really can transport us inside the novel, the descriptions are strong to make the scenes very visual to the reader. At some point, you will forget that you are reading the novel and you'll be traveling the world alongside Addie. But that's just it -- at some point.

Thus, the reason why the book is not 5 stars. There's nothing wrong with descriptive stories. Hell, some of my favorite authors have their novels loaded with descriptions, Tolkien, Tartt, etc. However, even when your focus is on the literary aesthetic, you must provide us with scenes that will add something to the story. Not necessarily make the plot go forward, or develop the character but show us something. A small detail of worldbuilding. A curiosity. Something new. Unfortunately, that is not always the case in Addie LaRue. Schwab sometimes falls into the trap of not trusting the reader to get it, ends up on repetition of scenes, sentences, and even descriptions. There is a limit to how many beautiful metaphors and sentences you can make until you start repeating them incessantly to the point that well... it wears away to nothing, just like rocks (as even Schwab says in her novel). I do feel like the novel could be a bit shorter (many stuff at the beginning and even the middle could be trimmed) and it would still count for a wonderful story about the power of words, ideas, freedom, time, and life.

In the end, it is a simple tale, but beautiful nonetheless, and that I super recommend if you think it is something that suits your interests. I do not think this is a book for everyone though. (But is there such a thing?)