Reviews

A History of My Brief Body by Billy-Ray Belcourt

elyssaisntreal's review against another edition

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challenging dark emotional hopeful informative inspiring reflective sad tense fast-paced

5.0

spookyaz's review against another edition

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challenging dark emotional hopeful reflective sad tense fast-paced

3.5


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kamp99's review against another edition

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2.5

Accompanied by the audiobook 🎧

alyssa_sian_reads's review against another edition

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challenging dark emotional reflective medium-paced

5.0

betweentwobookends's review against another edition

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adventurous challenging dark emotional funny informative inspiring mysterious reflective relaxing slow-paced

3.5

lisa_doe's review against another edition

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challenging dark emotional informative reflective medium-paced

3.5

oddreyloo's review against another edition

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2.0

i’m so sorry…i didn’t really like this book. the language was just a little Too Much for me. maybe i need to read this man’s poetry though, because he quoted a bunch of poets that i Do like!! (ocean vuong, layli long soldier, etc.)

anyway,, happy pride month!

alexaliz's review against another edition

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dark informative

4.0

iris_krauze's review against another edition

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challenging emotional hopeful informative inspiring reflective sad medium-paced

5.0

Billy-Ray Belcourt is an icredible Poet, and this memoir/work of art brought me into a raw, and beautiful journey with him, meditating on being Queer and Indigenous, and existing in a world where those aspects of your being are intimately tied with aspects of a racist colonial world and history that is invested in your un-being. I feel that this book is really a necessary read for many (most) Canadians, and I feel so grateful this exists! 

Hard to say more about this other than the fact that it is so beautiful and I am in awe with this person who poured so much of themselves into this piece. I am in love with the way that Billy-Ray Belcourt reassigns blame and shame away from Indigenous youth and towards Canada for suicide epidemics amongst Indigenous youth, stating (in much more eloquent words) that as it stands, the sky may seem more open than the world you currently exist in, and that is not to say that suicide should be encouraged, but that the world needs changing.