Reviews

The Kite Runner, by Khaled Hosseini

bookswithbibi's review against another edition

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3.0

This book was only okay. I couldn't connect with any of the characters and I can't really explain why, but I just didn't like it that much. Khaled Hosseini's second book, [b:A Thousand Splendid Suns|128029|A Thousand Splendid Suns|Khaled Hosseini|https://d.gr-assets.com/books/1345958969s/128029.jpg|3271379] was really good and he is a good writer but this story just wasn't for me.

megglaser's review

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dark emotional reflective sad medium-paced
  • Plot- or character-driven? Character
  • Strong character development? Yes
  • Loveable characters? It's complicated
  • Diverse cast of characters? Yes
  • Flaws of characters a main focus? Yes

4.25

kimlizzya's review against another edition

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5.0

Set over a lifetime, The Kite Runner explores how someone’s past can shape, and haunt, the present and how the countries we grow up in stay with us for the rest of our lives. Amir and Hassan, after nursing off the same woman as children, are told they have a bond and though they grow up in different circumstances, one rich one poor, they fulfill that prediction. But once an act of betrayal separates them, one must find his way to redemption.
Khaled Hosseini writes the majority of The Kite Runner in past tense but uses present tense during dramatic moments. It’s a technique that puts the reader in the character’s shoes and is the equivalent of a T.V. show slowing down the film and fading out all surrounding sounds. It often brings focus and power to the scene without becoming cheesy.
Many innocent places and events turn out to have a sinister quality to them in this book. Kite running, a day of fun and celebration, turns into a symbol of mistakes for one character while an orphanage, seemingly benevolent on the outside, sells children for money. Hosseini also returns to these subjects though and puts them back into their original light, further exemplifying this theme of redemption.
Are you interested in the events in Afghanistan? Did you have a rocky relationship with your childhood friend? Or do you just want to cry? All of the above? Then read this book. I didn’t cry, but there’s a good chance you will. This book could be enjoyed by anyone (at the right age) even if you just want to read it for writing style.

aninthios's review

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emotional fast-paced
  • Plot- or character-driven? Character
  • Strong character development? Yes
  • Loveable characters? It's complicated
  • Flaws of characters a main focus? Yes

4.0

maddb_96's review against another edition

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4.0

Would’ve been 5 stars but I can’t help compare it to A Thousand Splendid Suns, which I preferred. I did really enjoy how I felt as though as I was remembering the protagonist’s memories when they were referenced like they were my own.

___a1ice's review

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challenging dark emotional sad medium-paced
  • Plot- or character-driven? Character
  • Strong character development? Yes
  • Loveable characters? Yes
  • Diverse cast of characters? Yes
  • Flaws of characters a main focus? Yes

5.0

This book made me ache.

it_me_rachael's review

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adventurous dark informative tense medium-paced
  • Plot- or character-driven? Plot
  • Strong character development? Yes
  • Loveable characters? Yes
  • Diverse cast of characters? Yes
  • Flaws of characters a main focus? No

4.25

aivhe's review against another edition

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5.0

Now THIS unearthed feelings I’ve never felt in a long time. I swear at some point, my head felt like it’s inflating and I wanted to punch something.

I’m aware that Afghanistan is in turmoil but after reading this, I felt more ashamed. While the rest of the world is focused on having a piece of the future, some just want their old life back.

“There are a lot of children in Afghanistan, but little childhood.” This hit me hard.

sk_11's review

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emotional hopeful sad fast-paced
  • Plot- or character-driven? Character
  • Strong character development? Yes
  • Loveable characters? Yes
  • Diverse cast of characters? Yes
  • Flaws of characters a main focus? Yes

5.0

amynbell's review against another edition

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5.0

We currently have 3 Afghani students applying for visas to attend the ESL school I work for, so this is a timely book for me to read because of the difficulties they're encountering. I just got a call that the father of one family was able to get his visa but the wife and 4 children were not as collateral for his return. The other Afghani family applying is scattered as refugees such that the children live in UAE and the parents live in Pakistan.

Largely, I think even well-educated and world-aware Americans still don't have a clear picture of what it's like to live in some of the more volatile places in the world today. And most of us are never going to get a chance to visit except through the pages of a book. The Kite Runner shows the splendor of Afghanistan before the Soviet invasion and also after the Taliban came in as false saviors. It shows today's Afghanistan as a nation largely filled with rubble, hungry people, and injustices. In one part of the book, Amir visits Afghanistan and isn't able to call his wife (who is in the USA) for a month. I didn't understand that until I heard a news item on NPR this morning explaining how it's only recently that Afghanistan has gotten cell phones and how land lines have been unheard of for years.

The story of Afghanistan is only a backdrop for the story of 2 best friends who are torn apart by ethnicity, jealousy, and lies. It is the story of the betrayal of a best friend and redemption that spans 4 decades. The tendrils of the lies that caused this betrayal and its aftereffects reaches to 3 different generations.

I wish I'd read this book sooner, but it was so popular that I stayed away from it. Sometimes extremely popular books are popular for a reason. I'm curious now to read Hosseini's other book. He has a true gift for telling the story of not just the characters of the book but also the story of a nation.